Cambridge American Cemetery

Overview

The Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial site in England, 30.5 acres in total, was donated by the University of Cambridge. It lies on a slope with the west and south sides framed by woodland. The cemetery contains the remains of 3,812 of our war dead; 5,127 names are recorded on the Walls of the Missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. Most died in the Battle of the Atlantic or in the strategic air bombardment of northwest Europe.

From the flagpole platform near the main entrance, the great mall with its reflecting pools stretches eastward. It is from the mall that the wide, sweeping curve of the burial area across the lawn is best appreciated. Along the south side are the Walls of the Missing, and at the far end is the memorial with a chapel, two huge military maps, stained glass windows bearing the state seals and military decorations, and a mosaic ceiling memorial honoring the dead of our air forces.

A new, 4,000-square-foot center visitor center opened in May 2014. Through interpretive exhibits that incorporate personal stories, photographs, films, and interactive displays, visitors will gain a better understanding of this critical campaign that contributed to the Allied victory in Europe during World War II. Download the free Cambridge American Cemetery smartphone app for suggested tours of the cemetery, maps, history, and other important details about the site.

News and Events

This year marks the 150th anniversary of Memorial Day. While remembrance of America’s war dead took place prior to 1868, it wasn’t until...
In World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, millions of Americans served far from home. In the various conflicts, service members...
During the 166th  ABMC Board of Commissioners’ Meeting on April 11, 2018, seven new commissioners were sworn in. This group, which includes...
Secretary William M. Matz  participated in a Facebook Live session, where he talked about his role at the agency.

Cambridge American Cemetery Visitor Center Film

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Dedicated
1956
Location
United Kingdom
Burials
3,812
Missing in Action
5,127
Acres
30.50

Visiting Hours

The cemetery and visitor center are open to the public daily and on the majority of host country public holidays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cemetery is closed on December 25 and January 1. The cemetery, visitor center and car park are fully wheelchair-accessible. All visitor services at the cemetery are free.

Contact Us

Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial
Madingley Road
Coton CB23 7PH
Cambridge
United Kingdom
tel Phone: +44 (0)1954 210 350

Visitor Center

A new, 4,000-square-foot center visitor center opened in May 2014. Through interpretive exhibits that incorporate personal stories, photographs, films, and interactive displays, visitors will gain a better understanding of this critical campaign that contributed to the Allied victory in Europe during World War II. Interactive displays in the visitor center include the Battle of the Atlantic and Americans in Great Britain.

Download the free Cambridge American Cemetery smartphone app for suggested tours of the cemetery, maps, history, and other important details about the site.

History

The demands of World War II called again upon American youth to defend the liberties of free peoples. Young Americans lost their lives long before Pearl Harbor, as merchant seaman rallied to the British cause in the Battle of the Atlantic and American Eagle Squadrons joined the Royal Air Force in the skies above Britain.

Once the United States entered the war in December 1941, air, ground, and naval forces streamed into Britain. The Eighth Air Force made Britain its home, striking enemy targets in Europe from August 1942 to May 1945. More than 220,000 Americans were stationed here until 75 percent were sent to battle in North Africa, starting in November 1942. Campaigns to liberate North Africa, Sicily, and Italy governed troop commitments over the next year.

The mid-1943 decision to launch the cross-Channel invasion at Normandy in 1944 renewed the buildup in Britain—the “Friendly Invasion.” By June 6, 1944, 1.6 million Americans lived here. Within three months of D-Day, 1.2 million had surged into battle on the continent.

The U.S. commitment to liberty and democracy brought more than 3 million Americans to the British Isles in World War II. Separated by a common language, we learned about each other. Relationships built then remain strong in the 21st Century. Cambridge American Cemetery became a symbol of our nation’s sacrifice and a sacred meeting place to recall our mutual past.

Cambridge American Cemetery App
Download the Cambridge American Cemetery App to serve as your personal tour guide.
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